From author JB Coffman, we learn that life is a never-ending road full of possibilities by Tracy Diane Miller

JB Coffman writes about life.

The author of the realistic and emotionally gripping book Roote 66 isn’t afraid to explore life in all its sometimes challenging, sometimes tragic yet sometimes hopeful permutations. Coffman offers no magic wand, no special incantation and no special powers for her heroes. And make no mistakes: Her characters are heroes who rise above all that destiny throws their way; they grow and in the process, they help others.

Roote 66 (read the book to discover the creative genius behind the unique title) tells the story of a group of societal misfits whose lives connect. But one of the questions that the reader will ask him or herself: Are they really misfits? The Bend and a diner called Maxie’s  provide the external landscape for the internal journeys of main protagonists Evan (Ev) Brom and Lorraine (Rainey) Addison. Ev is a former forensic accountant whose road trip along Route 66 offers a means of healing from unspeakable tragedy. Rainey is a study in contradictions. On the outside, she presents as a sometimes bombastic waitress; yet, Rainey carries her own scars of self-doubt and pain that she has kept meticulously hidden. Ev is the handsome, mysterious stranger. One night stands may have easily branded him as an uncaring jerk. But he wears a metaphorical scarlet letter “p” for pain blazed across his chest and doesn’t wish to have foster meaningful relationship with anyone. As Roote 66 progresses, this all changes for Ev.

The Bend is the silent witness to these characters’ lives. Connection provides them with a lifeline. Further, Coffman carefully fleshed out Ev and Rainey. They aren’t perfect and they don’t profess to be. They make mistakes. They hurt. They laugh. They cry. What they don’t do is give up.

Roote 66 is a powerful tale of family (the family we choose not the family chosen for us courtesy of genetics), courage, loyalty and hope. It is an entertaining and thought-provoking book that resonates with universal appeal.

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